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Author Topic: A question for you Canadians  (Read 3055 times)

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Imashomer

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A question for you Canadians
« on: Feb 07, 2013, 03:41 PM »
Are we really that fucked down here?
"Ricky, can you try to explain to me why your dad would opt to piss in non-biodegradable containers instead of pissing on a tree like everyone else?"
"Bubbles it's not his fault, he's a trucker. They do things a little bit differently, they don't time to stop. it's not their fault. It's how they learned to piss."

Tiggy Puddin

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #1 on: Feb 07, 2013, 03:43 PM »
I've travelled the world... and to be honest... everywhere is fucked.  :lol:

Fishyneil

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #2 on: Feb 07, 2013, 03:44 PM »
All the American ORGsters I've met have been top notch people. Like Tiggy said, there are plenty of fucked people everywhere.
Fishy
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To get out of this place
You and me and all our friends
Such a happy human race"

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DavidB_Bubbles

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #3 on: Feb 07, 2013, 05:54 PM »
I have traveled the world as well.  Lived in Japan, Spain and Italy when I was in the U.S. Navy and visited many ports in the Far East as was as doing the Eurail thing a couple of times when I was there.  All I can say is Tiggy is right there are fucked people everywhere.  We are all human beings and are all susceptible to the same fucked up gene in all of us.  It's just some use it more than others. Often they have no clue they are using it  :P   

cinthb

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #4 on: Feb 07, 2013, 08:37 PM »
I concur with the 3 mods.  I lived in Germany for a short time years ago, and visited Windsor, Ont. when I was much younger.  The places we visit, learn and hear about can seam better than where we're from, in one way or another on the surface, but soon enough the idiots, collective rules, unrealistic expectations, and assholes come out of the woodwork.  I can love the USA, and hate stupid Americans all in one breath.  Politics is the worst thing to focus on for any assurance of goodness in our country.  Sometimes it's not easy to see unless we're really looking for 'good' as apposed to focusing only on the (sometimes daily) insane shit.

riverman

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #5 on: Feb 08, 2013, 12:40 PM »
You can take a hundred people from where doesn't matter  put them on an Island and in a couple of days the place would be fucked up I promise.

Sunny Vale

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #6 on: Feb 23, 2013, 03:54 PM »
If you think Oregon is fucked, come to Cincinnati...it is fucked big-time!  :ricky: only decent thing about it is all the sports...but even that's kind of fucked too (Bengals!). Go Reds! Go Cyclones! 

cinthb

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #7 on: Jan 29, 2014, 07:07 PM »
The Maple Leaf question.  In a land where leafy trees can't grow in the northern most 1/4 of the country, or stay dormant(bare) 6 months of the year in the 1/4 below that, coupled with the obvious fact that pine trees are way, WAY more abundant above the 49th parallel, and the knowledge that a hundred and a half species, mostly native to Asia, are called "Aser". 

Why?  :lol:
« Last Edit: Jan 29, 2014, 07:11 PM by cinthb »

bajjer

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #8 on: Mar 16, 2014, 11:33 AM »
All the American ORGsters I've met have been top notch people. Like Tiggy said, there are plenty of fucked people everywhere.
Fishy
I concur.
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cinthb

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Re: A question for you Canadians
« Reply #9 on: Mar 18, 2014, 06:05 PM »
Thinking some didn't get the humor of my last post, or the actual question I posed.  Why the Maple Leaf?  Well I did my own search, since no one here seamed to have a ready response. so I'm posting this, and apologize if I came off as not funny.

Quote
Why the Maple Leaf?

Why was the maple leaf chosen as the official symbol on Canada’s national flag?

Some may question why the maple leaf was eventually chosen as the symbol used on Canada’s flag, particularly given that the sugar maple, used as the model for the maple leaf design on Canada’s national flag, is found only in eastern Canada. Further to this, the majority of Canada’s maple trees are, in fact, only found east of Manitoba. By contrast, the beaver, a symbol of industriousness, and responsible for Canada’s burgeoning fur trade in the 1800s, is found widely across the country. In 1849, when famous Canadian engineer Sandford Fleming was asked to design Canada’s first adhesive postage stamp, he chose to portray a beaver building a dam near a waterfall.

There are several reasons why the maple leaf was a more appropriate choice. For one thing, the maple leaf is simply easier to draw. For another, the maple leaf is red, one of Canada’s national colours (the other is white). Finally, the fur trade is a part of Canada’s historical past, and the image of the beaver no longer resonated with Canadians in the same manner that it would have in the nineteenth century.

Further to these arguments, historically speaking, the image of the maple leaf has frequently been used as a symbol of Canada. To cite a few examples:

    *In 1860, the design of the badge for the Prince of Wales Royal Canadian Regiment included a maple leaf. Also in 1860, the maple leaf featured prominently in decorations for a visit by the Prince of Wales.
    *In 1867, Alexander Muir penned “The Maple Leaf Forever” as a song for Confederation.
    *Between 1876 and 1901, the maple leaf was featured on all Canadian coins; today, the maple leaf is found on the penny).
    *Between 1899 and 1902, Canadian soldiers fighting in the Boer War (a conflict in South Africa between the British and descendents of South Africa’s Dutch settlers) wore a maple leaf on their helmets.
    *In 1904, Canadian athletes competing in the Olympic Games wore shirts displaying the maple leaf.
    *In World Wars I and II, the maple leaf was displayed on soldiers’ caps, badges, and military equipment.
    *In 1921, the Canadian shield was revised so that the provincial emblems were replaced with a maple leaf.
    *In 1980, for his ‘Marathon of Hope’ run across Canada, Terry Fox wore a white T-shirt with the maple leaf embedded on a map of Canada.
    *Throughout the 20th century, Canadian teams wore the maple leaf on their uniforms in international competitions.

Today, around the world, the maple leaf is inextricably linked with Canada.